Greg Garrard

Research

Professor Greg Garrard recently moved to UBC from Bath Spa University, a modern institution on an estate landscaped by ‘Capability’ Brown in the 18th century. During his tenure at BSU, Garrard developed a multitude of courses on poetry, environmental writing, critical animal studies, and British literature, and was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship for his work on improving learning and teaching. As an undercover Canadian, he also introduced the university’s first course on Canadian Literature and Culture. In moving to Kelowna, he is technically ‘coming home’, but is really lighting out for the territories in personal and cultural terms.

Garrard has been researching and teaching ecocriticism throughout his career. His Ecocriticism (Routledge 2004, 2011), the most widely used introduction to the field, has been translated into Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, Korean and - in an unofficial Taiwanese edition – Mandarin Chinese. As a commentator and critic, he reviewed the year’s work in ecocriticism 2009-11; as an organiser, he chaired the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (UKI); as an editor, he has put together the Oxford Handbook of Ecocriticism, the biggest single-volume collection yet published in the field. His interests are somewhat ungovernable: his page on academia.edu collects essays on rhododendrons and Romantic poetry; Seamus Heaney, Heidegger and Nazism; air travel in climate change fiction; radical Canadian cinema, Werner Herzog and Wall-E; Ian McEwan, Margaret Atwood, Derek Jarman, eco-pedagogy and feral dogs.

 

He is currently working on an essay on bestiality and zoophilia in 20thcentury film and fiction; another on dog memoirs; and two book projects. Ferality Tales will examine representations of feral humans and feral dogs from The Call of Wild and The Jungle Book to Eva Hornung’s recent Dog Boy. Humans have profoundly shaped the nature of dogs, of course, but the shaping premise of the book is that, in addition, as the Australian Aboriginal saying has it, ‘dogs make us human’.Who Do They Think They Are? Climate Sceptics in the US, the UK and Germany will be a co-written book examining critically the texts and identities of climate sceptics, in print and online.

 

Last reviewed shim2/9/2017 12:12:33 PM