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Graduate Courses (2015-16)

Many courses are cross-listed and students are invited to take courses not listed under a particular degree, if your supervisory committee recommends/approves it

MFA | MA English | IGS MA | PhD

The following courses will be offered during the 2015-16 academic year. Click on the course name below for a brief description.

2015 Term 1 & Term 2

The Anthropocene is a putative geological epoch that is currently under formal consideration by the scientists of the International Anthropocene Working Group. At the same time, though, as a transformative naming of the present, it has enormous cultural implications. On one hand, it magnifies the significance of our species to a planetary, epochal scale; on the other, it diminishes our individual agency to an infinitesimal fraction of a mass effect. If, moreover, the origins of the Anthropocene event are to be found in the specific cultural history of the Western Europeans and North American nations where it began, then analysis of Western cultural artefacts may shed light on its distinctive characteristics.
    Instructor: Greg Garrard
    T: 250.807.8479
    E:itle="greg.garrard@ubc.ca" href="mailto:greg.garrard@ubc.ca">greg.garrard@ubc.ca
This course will take as its starting point the common refrain to ‘indigenize the academy’ that is touted by multiple sites of educational and administrative leadership in university environments. Our classroom investigation into current practices will demonstrate to students that while such rhetoric is not easily transformed into radical action, there do exist possibilities to shift contemporary perspectives and attitudes to truly perform an act of indigenization, that is, a reframing of the post-secondary educational landscape that has significant effect on lives and communities here on Aboriginal territory. The course would employ an interdisciplinary approach and numerous methodologies including Critical Race Theory, Critical Pedagogy, Indigenous Traditional Knowledges, and Postcolonial Theory.
This course examines exhibition and representation in context of colonial expositions, ethnographic museums, modernist primitivism, and politics of display. Explores ongoing challenges and contemporary strategies for change. Focused examination of colonial exhibition and postcolonial self-representation for Maori, African, and Indigenous peoples of the Americas..
This course explores the tension between the two types of knowing offered by reading and building. This course brings the Digital Humanities’ central methodology, thinking through making, to the humanities’ central methodology, enriching objects of study through interpretation and analysis. To engage both of these methodologies, the course is divided into four modules: Theorize, Build, Visualize/Analyze, and Communicate/Contribute.
This course examines the historical roles of capitalism and colonialism as twin projects of imperial domination. We link foundational cultural studies texts to recent scholarship on the politics of decolonization. We explore these texts to better grasp how we might communicate across difference in a (neo)colonial and late capitalist world where positions of dominator and dominated are not immediately evident. How do these conversations provide intellectual and political possibilities for radical social transformation? Key texts include the work of Karl Marx, Antonio Gramsci, Frantz Fanon, Michel Foucault, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Stuart Hall, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Vijay Prashad, Lisa Lowe, Andrea Smith, Sara Ahmed, Glen Coulthard, Achille Mbembe, Taiaiake Alfred, Jasbir Puar, Harsha Walia, Leanne Simpson, and Audra Simpson.
This course examines the relationship between concepts of innocence and cultural, racialized, and gendered identities in fiction written for children. Central to this examination is a critique of “childhood” as an idea or concept that is socially, culturally, and historically constructed, as well as the argument, proposed by Jacqueline Rose, that the concept of children’s fiction rests on an “impossibility.” The focus, then, is not on real children and their experiences, but rather on the ideas of childhood that have been constructed within Western culture, and how those ideas shape and are shaped by fiction written for and about children.
Instructor: Margaret Reeves
T: 250.807.9369
E: margaret.reeves@ubc.ca
This course will examine the representation of same-sex erotic desire in early modern England, between approximately 1520 and 1735. This expansive coverage in terms of
Instructor: Marie Loughlin
T: 250.807.9330
E: arie.loughlin@ubc.ca
This is a three-credit methodology class for students who are studying in the Master of Fine Arts program. It is designed to assist students in the development of their own creative research methodologies and approaches to praxis, particularly the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary practice. This course also gives students an opportunity to unearth a direction or an origin point, further develop existing research questions, and focus their creative practice as they move towards their thesis production. Assigned readings, seminar discussions with visiting artists and faculty members, and exposure to a broad range of research and creation projects by an interdisciplinary group of presenters will contribute to the course. This process of inquiry will culminate in a presentation of work in a seminar setting.
This course is designed for students who have a significant creative component to their graduate degree, including a creative thesis. It is an intensive manuscript production course that offers students at the graduate level opportunity for informed discussion about their chosen genre( as well as about their specific works-in-progress. At the conclusion of the course, students should have made significant progress on their theses and/or supplementary and contextualizing theoretical, analytical, or aesthetic frameworks.
This course focuses on the production of independent artwork and the critical analysis of that work. Students may work in any artistic discipline. The main objective of this course is to provide a supportive and critical environment in which students can determine an artistic direction and then proceed in that direction to create a substantial body of work.
This is a three-credit methodology class for students who are studying in the Master of Fine Arts program and who usually have taken CCS 506 and who are ready to apply ideas of creative research methods to particular problems or issues in contemporary art. It is designed to continue to assist students in the development of their own creative research methodologies and in approaches to praxis, particularly the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary practice. This course also gives students an opportunity to continue to develop existing research questions and focus their creative practice as they move towards their thesis production. Assigned readings, seminar discussions with visiting artists and faculty members, and exposure to a broad range of research and creation projects by an interdisciplinary group of presenters will contribute to the course. This process of inquiry will culminate in a presentation of work in a seminar setting. Second year MFA students will also present their thesis plans and model successful creative thesis production plans for first year students.
This course focuses on the production of independent artwork and the critical analysis of that work. Students may work in any artistic discipline. The main objective of this course is to provide a supportive and critical environment in which students can determine an artistic direction and then proceed in that direction to create a substantial body of work. Prerequisite: VISA 582, or permission of the Department of Creative Studies.

Last reviewed shim7/16/2015 8:37:56 AM