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Graduate Courses 

Students enrolling in cross-listed courses should ensure that they select the course number designation appropriate for their degree program. For example, IGS students should enrol in the IGS version of a cross-listed course.

M.F.A | M.A. English | IGS M.A. | Ph.D.

The following courses will be offered during the 2016-17 academic year. Click on the course name below for a brief description. 

2016 Term 1 & Term 2

This course examines cultural implications of new media on diverse forms of global migration. Drawing on a wide range of contemporary resources across disciplines, the course explores how global digital media are integrated into the migratory lives of ethnic minorities and global diasporas. First, the course develops theoretical frameworks for a critical understanding of transnational new media-scape and user cultures. For this purpose, critical theories such as postcolonial media theory, critical race theory, and trans-media theory will be reviewed. Second, the course engages with recent empirical studies of migrant media users in transnational contexts, such as Filipino ICT users in the UK and Greek online communities in Canada. The proposed course will help students understand the interconnections between global digital media, global and local power relations, and migrants’ sociality and identity.
This course will engage IGS students in the interdisciplinary and cross-cultural investigation of key epistemological and methodological questions articulated by leading international qualitative researchers. Topics will include feminist, Indigenous, decolonizing, arts-based and community-based approaches to qualitative research, and students will explore notions of positionality, reflexivity, intersubjectivity, accountability, relevance, and reciprocity.
This course will focus on theories and practices of community-based environmental art which can include community arts and eco-activism as well as community-specific art practices. The course will focus on the social responsibility of artists and the relevance of art to society. The course will discuss trends in a variety of art practices (writing, visual art, film, performance) that reframe art as a method for community groups and activists to explore and engage with contemporary societal issues regarding the environment, as well as a method for artists to contribute original approaches to these issues. The course aims to define, theorize and critically engage with the growing body of work in this area, including artistic case studies and documentation, critical and theoretical debates, and application of this theory by engaging in a large, multi-city ecoart project.
Exploring the interdisciplinary roots of critical theory in philosophy, linguistics, aesthetics, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, and feminism, this course examines the ways in which theory informs current practices of interpretation.
Interdisciplinary introduction to the field of cultural studies theory and the heterogeneous body of cultural and social texts, objects, and events that it critically frames and examines.
Introduction to the profession's expectations, practices, and responsibilities. This is a Pass/Fail course and is reserved for MA in English students.
This course examines Victorian influences on postcolonial literature and culture. In particular, it considers the uses made of George Eliot’s works in the early development of the postcolonial project and especially in certain texts by Edward Said, in light of more recent critical assessments by critics such as Frederic Jameson and Paul Gilroy. Representative works by the different authors will be examined.
The course examines how Canadian cultural nationalism after the Second World War is shaped by elite state sponsored institutions like the CRTC, CBC, NFB, and Canada Council that work with and against the global hegemony of transnational media, and by local and provincial forms of heritage. It will necessarily trace the influence of American and British colonialism on the construction of Canadian and British Columbian identity as a series of "not that" statements that regulate identity within a discourse that tends to erase the legacy of the settler/colonialist. This historical reading of cultural nationalism will examine primarily Western Canadian film, theatre, pageants, popular histories, and the federal “elitist" institutions used to shape culture and identity. It will examine issues of whiteness, regionalism, assimilation, race, ethnicity, gender, and official multiculturalism.

This course engages two of the most contested avant-garde experiments of the early twentieth century: Vorticism and Futurism. The seminal experimentalism of technique and style that animated these movements has outlasted, as it were, the very technologies celebrated and anthropomorphized in their manifestos, literature, paintings, sculptures, and photographs; and now, a century later, the boundaries between biology and the machine blur in ever more tangible ways in the prosthetic, transhumanist art of such contemporary artists as Stelarc and Orlan.

Focused on postmodernism in the context of “CanLit,” this course takes as its point of departure a statement made by Robert David Stacey in his introduction to RE: Reading the Postmodern: Canadian Literature and Criticism after Modernism (2010). “At one time in the academic and intellectual life in this country,” Stacey writes, “‘postmodernism’ was a powerful word” (xi). Why does Stacey speak of Canadian postmodernism’s “power” in the past tense? When did the word lose its “power,” and for what reasons?.

This is a three-credit methodology class for students who are studying in the Master of Fine Arts program. It is designed to assist students in the development of their own creative research methodologies and approaches to praxis, particularly the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary practice. This course also gives students an opportunity to unearth a direction or an origin point, further develop existing research questions, and focus their creative practice as they move towards their thesis production. Assigned readings, seminar discussions with visiting artists and faculty members, and exposure to a broad range of research and creation projects by an interdisciplinary group of presenters will contribute to the course. This process of inquiry will culminate in a presentation of work in a seminar setting.
This is a three-credit methodology class for students who are studying in the Master of Fine Arts program and who usually have taken CCS 506 and who are ready to apply ideas of creative research methods to particular problems or issues in contemporary art. It is designed to continue to assist students in the development of their own creative research methodologies and in approaches to praxis, particularly the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary practice. This course also gives students an opportunity to continue to develop existing research questions and focus their creative practice as they move towards their thesis production. Assigned readings, seminar discussions with visiting artists and faculty members, and exposure to a broad range of research and creation projects by an interdisciplinary group of presenters will contribute to the course. This process of inquiry will culminate in a presentation of work in a seminar setting. Second year MFA students will also present their thesis plans and model successful creative thesis production plans for first year students.
This course is designed for students who have a significant creative component to their graduate degree, including a creative thesis. It is an intensive manuscript production course that offers students at the graduate level opportunity for informed discussion about their chosen genre as well as about their specific works-in-progress. At the conclusion of the course, students should have made significant progress on their theses and/or supplementary and contextualizing theoretical, analytical, or aesthetic frameworks. MFA Creative Writing students are to take this course twice during their program for a total of 6 credits.
This course focuses on the production of independent artwork and the critical analysis of that work. Students may work in any artistic discipline. The main objective of this course is to provide a supportive and critical environment in which students can determine an artistic direction and then proceed in that direction to create a substantial body of work.
This course focuses on the production of independent artwork and the critical analysis of that work. Students may work in any artistic discipline. The main objective of this course is to provide a supportive and critical environment in which students can determine an artistic direction and then proceed in that direction to create a substantial body of work. Prerequisite: VISA 582, or permission of the Department of Creative Studies.

Last reviewed shim6/30/2016 4:12:07 PM