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Graduate Courses 

Students enrolling in cross-listed courses should ensure that they select the course number designation appropriate for their degree program. For example, IGS students should enrol in the IGS version of a cross-listed course.

M.F.A | M.A. English | IGS M.A. | Ph.D.

The following courses will be offered during the 2017-18 academic year. Click on the course name below for a brief description. 

2017 Term 1 & Term 2

Exploring the interdisciplinary roots of critical theory in philosophy, linguistics, aesthetics, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, and feminism, this course examines the ways in which theory informs current practices of interpretation.
Interdisciplinary introduction to the field of cultural studies theory and the heterogeneous body of cultural and social texts, objects, and events that it critically frames and examines.
Introduction to the profession's expectations, practices, and responsibilities. This is a Pass/Fail course and is reserved for MA in English students.
This course will survey, examine and critique the disciplinary origins and the theoretical underpinnings of the academic field known today as "creative writing" as well as its associated pedagogies, the most central of which is the workshop. This forcus of this course will be on creative writing not as a general practice, but specifically as a discipline that emerged within U.S. American, Canadian and British universities.
This course will examine the relationship between early modern women’s writing and modern feminist theory. The goal is to determine the extent to which early modern women writers can be counted as feminist forerunners. Possible areas of inquiry include the politics of literary history, how female subjectivity is represented, how women actively contest restrictive cultural and behavioural codes, and the nature of female to female intimacy.
The course offers advanced study of ecocritical theory and its application to Canadian literature, including indigenous authors. Ecocritisism, or environmentally-orientated literary and cultural critisism, has developed as a globalized literary theory with frequent reference to aesthetic conventions seem constricting or enabling to Canadian authors, and to ask whether interpretive schema informed by them are illuminating or misleading to Canadian students of environmental literature.

This course will examine historical and cultural forms of domination particularly in relation to the "feminine" and nature.But most significantly, it will focus on the role of transformative ethical relations - or what Joanne Macy calls "ecocentrism" - to shape sustainable relations with the natural or, the more-than-human world. This course will also explore the "affective turn" in ecofeminism that has to do with adopting a trans-species episteme based on "the clear-sighted recognition of connection across the discredited breach of nature and culture" (Haraway, 1991) and will be predicated upon ethos of what philosopher Kelly Oliver has called "strange kinship", which is based "not on blood or on generation but on a shared embodiment and the gestures of love and friendship among living creatures made possible by bodies coexisting in a world on which we depend" (2009). Similarly, we will also examine areas areas germane to ecofeminism within the field of critical animal studies that, based on moral considerations or compassion towards the nonhuman, involve an "ethics of care", which is one that recognizes conditions of habitation and ecological principles inseparable from the larger environment. 

This is a three-credit methodology class for students who are studying in the Master of Fine Arts program. It is designed to assist students in the development of their own creative research methodologies and approaches to praxis, particularly the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary practice. This course also gives students an opportunity to unearth a direction or an origin point, further develop existing research questions, and focus their creative practice as they move towards their thesis production. Assigned readings, seminar discussions with visiting artists and faculty members, and exposure to a broad range of research and creation projects by an interdisciplinary group of presenters will contribute to the course. This process of inquiry will culminate in a presentation of work in a seminar setting.
This is a three-credit methodology class for students who are studying in the Master of Fine Arts program and who usually have taken CCS 506 and who are ready to apply ideas of creative research methods to particular problems or issues in contemporary art. It is designed to continue to assist students in the development of their own creative research methodologies and in approaches to praxis, particularly the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary practice. This course also gives students an opportunity to continue to develop existing research questions and focus their creative practice as they move towards their thesis production. Assigned readings, seminar discussions with visiting artists and faculty members, and exposure to a broad range of research and creation projects by an interdisciplinary group of presenters will contribute to the course. This process of inquiry will culminate in a presentation of work in a seminar setting. Second year MFA students will also present their thesis plans and model successful creative thesis production plans for first year students.
This course is designed for students who have a significant creative component to their graduate degree, including a creative thesis. It is an intensive manuscript production course that offers students at the graduate level opportunity for informed discussion about their chosen genre as well as about their specific works-in-progress. At the conclusion of the course, students should have made significant progress on their theses and/or supplementary and contextualizing theoretical, analytical, or aesthetic frameworks. MFA Creative Writing students are to take this course twice during their program for a total of 6 credits.
This course focuses on the production of independent artwork and the critical analysis of that work. Students may work in any artistic discipline. The main objective of this course is to provide a supportive and critical environment in which students can determine an artistic direction and then proceed in that direction to create a substantial body of work.
This course focuses on the production of independent artwork and the critical analysis of that work. Students may work in any artistic discipline. The main objective of this course is to provide a supportive and critical environment in which students can determine an artistic direction and then proceed in that direction to create a substantial body of work. Prerequisite: VISA 582, or permission of the Department of Creative Studies.

Last reviewed shim6/20/2017 8:42:47 AM